Its Beanie Time!

 
 

I haven't really focused on my knitting for a while.  I guess I have been caught up with my embroidery for far to long, not that this is a bad thing. I am a sweater designer, so I do enjoy knitting. It is just as relaxing as my embroidery or baking a pie.  I have a hard time sitting down to knit in the summer to prep for the winter ahead, I really only want to knit when it is cold out.  Logically I would take the time in the summer to make my inventory. However I am more logical when it comes to if I should order pizza or tacos* for dinner than I am to my approach of stocking my winter inventory.  

I really love this beanie pattern, I tweaked a pattern I had gotten from a friend and simplified it. If you don't know how to knit I suggest google and youtube to get some basics. You will need to know how to cast on, knitting abbreviations, cast off, close a seam and make a pom.  I could blog about all those things here but that would be a small book and I don't have time for that. One day soon I will have classes*...but until then you will have to teach yourself. 

 

(1)*the answer is always tacos (2)*make sure to sign up for my newsletter to get notices about when I plan to launch my classes

 
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I am a yarn snob. I admit it with all my heart. Natural fibers are always better! All humanely sourced* animal fibers will always offer a superior product.  They will last longer, be warmer and in some cases be the softest.*  Things to remember when choosing yarn if it is good enough to keep an animal alive in the winter it is good enough for your head. Another good rule to live by when picking yarn is; animal fibers (protein) are great for winter styles, grass and cotton fibers are great for summer/spring styles. My last rule is never acrylic, just don't. 

Purl Soho and Wool and The Gang are both a great resource for yarns.

(1)*most Angora fibers are not humanely sourced (2)*cashmere, alpaca and llama are all very soft fibers

 

 

 
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The tighter you knit the smaller your hat will be, if you know you have an issue with this I would suggest to make some small test swatches to make sure you can get the correct measurements.  You can pull these swatches apart and still use the yarn after you figure out the correct tension.

Also on the same note if you cast on tightly the beanie opening will be tighter with less stretch.  

Just keep both these things in mind when knitting.  

 
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If you feel like getting fancy you can add in a stripe, marl two yarn colors together or even two different yarns. I used a wool heather and then an alpaca yarn to make one of my hats. This is the part where you get to be the designer, as long as you have the right size yarn and needles, anything goes. 

 
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This is the ladder stitch, you stitch straight across and alternate directions with each stitch. The ladder stitch is cleaner so you can have your hat cuffed.

This is the ladder stitch, you stitch straight across and alternate directions with each stitch. The ladder stitch is cleaner so you can have your hat cuffed.

This is the crochet stitch. You loop through your center back seam to the top crown. This is nice because you have more stretch and give at the seam. 

This is the crochet stitch. You loop through your center back seam to the top crown. This is nice because you have more stretch and give at the seam. 

 
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When you are finished knitting your hat, you are ready to make your pom. You might have enough yarn left but this is why you should always buy two just in case. There are fancy pom makers to get perfect poms, but you can also just used your hand and save some cash. Start by leaving a tail of yarn and then begin wrapping the yarn around your hand, keeping your fingers in place to make the size consistent, the more you wrap the denser your pom will be. If you want a bigger pom use something wider than your hand. I like to wrap the yarn around my hand until I get about 1 1/2 inches. Slide the yarn off your hand, tie the tails up as tight as you can around the middle, cut the loops, shake pom out and then trim it into a nice round shape. 

 
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Ok with all that being said I think you are ready to start. So pull up a spot on the floor, couch, bed or favorite chair.  Its time to get comfy, it is beanie time. 

SHOPPING LIST

  • 1-2 skeins of good quality yarn, chunky yarn. The back of the skein usually tells you what size needles to use. 
  • US 15, 16-inch straight needles
  • tapestry needle or crochet hook
  • scissor
  • tape measure

GAUGE

8-10 stitches = 4 inches in k1 x p1 rib, relaxed

SIZES

This is an adult size women's size hat. I would add 4-6 stitches to increase for men's size or take away 4 stitches to decrease for kid's.

  • Finished Width (flat at opening):  8-9 inches
  • Finished Height (not including pom and with cuff turned down): 11 inches
  • Pom Diameter: 4 ½ inches

PATTERN

Cast on 44 stitches.

K1 P1, knit until you have 11 inches.

K2tog, 22x

Knit 2 rows

K3tog, 7x

and cast off

ladder stitch or crochet center back seam 

cinch top opening and tie on pom